jury

During your criminal proceedings, the jury plays a large part in if you will be convicted. When the people seated in the jury box have such a large impact on a life-altering decision, it is important they are unbiased and committed to listening to all of the facts in your case. Our post-conviction relief attorneys at Harwell Legal Counsel LLC share how juror bias may affect your case.

What is Juror Bias?

Juror bias is any bias that a juror may have in their decision. When jurors are selected for trial, they go through questioning, where they are evaluated for biases. If a juror is determined to have a bias that would affect the ruling in the case, the juror may be ruled out from consideration.

Evidence in a Post-Conviction Relief Filing

If a biased juror was included on your jury panel, it may have affected your trial ruling. If you were determined to be guilty of your charges and believed the jury was biased against you, proof can be used as evidence in a post-conviction relief filing to challenge your guilt.

First, your attorney will need to find proof of juror bias and present it to the court to challenge your guilt during a post-conviction relief filing. If you cannot find proof of a biased jury, there are several other options where you can file for post-conviction relief, including new evidence found favorable to your case, perjury, ineffective assistance from counsel, or jurisdiction issues.

Harwell Legal Counsel LLC Post-Conviction Relief Attorneys

The conviction of you or a loved one can separate your family and alter your lives together. If you believe that you are not guilty and have new evidence in which your guilt would be challenged, our attorneys can help. We are skilled at filing for post-conviction relief motions and introducing new evidence to the court to challenge the guilt of our clients.

Do you believe your jury was biased? Call us today at (317) 401-8715 or fill out our online contact form to schedule a free initial consultation with our team today.

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